Saturday, November 19, 2011

Pusan

Pushan is also known as Puchan and is the astral God. Pushan is a protector and multiplier of cattle and of human possessions in general. As a cowherd, Pushan carries an ox-goad, and he is drawn by goats. He leads his adherents towards rich meadows and wealth. He always carried a golden hack that symbolized activity. His name denotes someone who is the reason of the people to prosper. He is invoked by the newly married couples to give good luck on the journey of their life.

In character, Pushan is a solar deity, beholds the entire universe, and is a guide on roads and journeys, and to the other world. He assists in the revolutions of day and night and shares with Soma the guardianship of living creatures. He is invoked along with the most various deities, but most frequently with Indra.

Pushan is the lord of all things moving and stationary. He is the inspirer of the soul, an unconquerable protector and defender, and is being sought to give increase of wealth. He is said to regard and to observe clearly and at once all creatures. Pushan is not only the tutelary god of travelers but also, like Savitri and Agni conducts departed spirits on their way to the other world.

Many hymns are addressed to Pushan. Pushan is praised in eight hymns in the Rig Veda. Some of these hymns or songs appeal to him to guard livestock and find lost livestock. Goats pull his chariots. At times he is considered as motivating the Sun in its path across the sky. It appears that Sun is represented by him as the protector of herd and flocks.

The single or detached verses of other hymns in which Pushan is mentioned are numerous. He is mentioned as abounding in wealth, as bringing blessings, as most bountiful, distinguished by all divine attributes. Pushan is related with Savitri, and is described as moving onward under his impulse, and as knowing and perceiving all creatures. In some other hymns Pushan is connected with the marriage ceremonial, being besought to take the bride`s hand and lead her away, and to bless her in her conjugal relation.

In the Hindu mythology, Pushan is describing as one of the twelve Aditi`s sons. Aditi`s twelve sons as narrated in Purana`s are Surya, Aryama, Pushan, Tvashta, Savita, Bhaga, Dhata, Vidhata, Varuna, Mitra, Indra, and Lord Vamana. He leads souls to other world. He protected travelers from being subjugated by other men. He acted like a supportive guide. He is portrayed as having no teeth which was the result of a fight with Lord Shiva. Therefore, he is offered gruels.

From: here
Pushan (Pūṣan) is a Vedic solar deity and one of the Adityas. He is the god of meeting. Pushan was responsible for marriages, journeys, roads, and the feeding of cattle. He was a psychopomp, conducting souls to the other world. He protected travelers from bandits and wild beasts, and protected men from being exploited by other men. He was a supportive guide, a "good" god, leading his adherents towards rich pastures and wealth. He carried a golden lance, a symbol of activity.

Etymology

The name of the deity is derived from Sanskrit verb, pūṣyati, which means "cause to thrive". So, his name means, "one who causes people to thrive."
[edit] Pushan in Vedic literature

Pūṣan is praised in eight hymns in the Rigveda. Some of these hymns appeal to him to guard livestock and find lost livestock. His chariot is pulled by goats.[1] Sometimes he is described as driving the Sun in its course across the sky. He seems to represent the sun as a guardian of flocks and herds.

According to a narrative found in the Taittiriya Samhita, Rudra was excluded from a certain sacrifice. He, in anger, pierced the sacrifice with an arrow and Pushan broke his teeth as he attempted to eat a part of the oblation. The later versions of this narrative are found in the Ramayana, Mahabharata and the Puranas. In these versions, Rudra or Shiva was angry because his father-in-law, Daksha, the sacrificer, did not invite him. Shiva, in anger, kicked Pushan and knocked out his teeth as he was eating the oblation.[2] In the Puranic versions, Virabhadra, created by Shiva from a lock of his matted hair knocked down Pushan's teeth.[3]

From: Wiki
Hymn LIV. Pūṣan.

1. O PUSAN, bring us to the man who knows, who shall direct us straight,
And say unto us, It is here.
2 May we go forth with Pūṣan who shall point the houses out to us,
And say to us, These same are they.
3 Unharmed is Pūṣan's chariot wheel; the box ne’er falleth to the ground,
Nor doth the loosened felIy shake.
4 Pūṣan forgetteth not the man who serveth him with offered gift:
That man is first to gather wealth.
5 May Pūṣan follow near our kine; may Pūṣan keep our horses safe:
May Pūṣan gather gear for us.
6 Follow the kine of him who pours libations out and worships thee;
And ours who sing thee songs of praise.
7 Let none be lost, none injured, none sink in a pit and break a limb.
Return with these all safe and sound.
8 Pūṣan who listens to our prayers, the Strong whose wealth is never lost,
The Lord of riches, we implore.
9 Secure in thy protecting care, O Pūṣan, never may we fail.
We here are they who sing thy praise.
10 From out the distance, far and wide, may Pūṣan stretch his right hand forth,
And drive our lost again to us.


From: Rig Veda
2. PUSHAN.

Pushan is the name of a sun-god to whom some hymns are exclusively addressed, and whose praise at other times is sung in connection with that of Indra and other gods. In these hymns his character is not very clearly defined. He is said * to behold the entire universe; is addressed as the guide of travellers, and the protector of cattle. He is called upon to protect his servants in battle, and to defend them as of old. He is invoked in the marriage ceremonial, and asked to take the bride's hand, to lead her away, and to bless her in her conjugal relations. He is said also to conduct the spirits of the departed from this world to the next. In one text he is called "the nourisher," as Vishnu in later times was called "the preserver." By far the greater number of prayers addressed to him seem to regard him as the guide and protector of travellers, both along the ordinary journeys of life and in the longer journey to the other world; and as he is supposed to be constantly travelling about, he is said to know the road by which they have to go.

The following is a specimen of the hymns addressed to Pushan in the Rig-Veda:—"Conduct us, Pushan, over our road; remove distress, son of the deliverer; go on before us. Smite away from before us the destructive and injurious wolf which seeks after us. Drive away from our path the waylayer, the thief and the robber. Tread with thy foot upon the burning weapons of that deceitful wretch, whoever he be. O wonder-working and wise Pushan, we desire that help of thine wherewith thou didst favour our fathers! O god, who bringest all blessings, and art distinguished by the golden spear, make wealth easy of acquisition! Convey us past our opponents; make our paths easy to travel; gain strength for us here. Lead us over a country of rich pastures; let no new trouble (beset our) path. Bestow, satiate, grant, stimulate us; fill our belly. We do not reproach Pushan, we praise him with hymns; and we seek riches from the wonder-working god." * "May we, O Pushan! meet with a wise man who will straightway direct us and say, 'It is this.' May Pushan follow our kine; may he protect our horses; may he give us food. . . . Come hither, glowing god, the deliverer, may we meet." †

In the Purānas Pushan occupies a far less exalted position. It seems almost like a burlesque to see him, who in the Vedas is reverently approached as the giver of good to his worshippers, described as being obliged to feed upon gruel, because his teeth have been knocked out of his mouth. The earliest form of the legend describing this event is found in the Taittiriya Sanhita. Rudra, the name by which Siva was then known, not being invited to a great sacrifice that Daksha, his father-in-law, was celebrating, in his anger shot an arrow which pierced the sacrificial victim. Pushan ate his share, and in doing so broke his teeth. In describing Daksha, ‡ an account of this sacrifice will be given. In the "Vishnu Purāna" Pushan appears as one of the Ādityas.

From: Hindu Mythology, Vedic and Puranic, by W.J. Wilkins
PUSÁN This god is celebrated in eight hymns, five of which occur in the sixth Mandala. His individuality is vague, and his anthropomorphic traits are scanty. His foot and his right band are mentioned; he wears braided hair and a beard. He carries a golden spear, an awl, and a goad. His car is drawn by goats instead of horses. His characteristic food is gruel (karambhá).


He sees all creatures clearly and at once. He is the wooer of his mother and the lover of his sister (Dawn), and was given by the gods to the Sun-maiden Surya as a husband. He is connected with the marriage ceremonial in the wedding hymn (x. 85). With his golden aerial ships Pusan acts as the messenger of Surya. He moves onward observing the universe, and makes his abode in heaven. He is a guardian who knows and beholds all creatures. As best of charioteers he drove downward the golden wheel of the sun. He traverses the distant path of heaven and earth; he goes to and returns from both the beloved abodes. He conducts the dead on the far-off path of the Fathers. He is a guardian of roads, removing dangers out of the way; and is called 'son of deliverance' (vimúco nápat). He follows and protects cattle, bringing them home unhurt and driving back the lost. His bounty is often mentioned. 'Glowing' (aghrni) is one of his exclusive epithets. The name means 'prosperer', as derived from pus, cause to thrive. The evidence, though not clear, indicates that Pusan was originally a solar deity, representing the beneficent power of the sun manifested chiefly in its pastoral aspect.


From: here
Pusan. The name of Pusan is mentioned about 120 times in
the RV. and he is celebrated in eight hymns (five of them occurring in the
sixth, two in the first, and one in the tenth book). He is also lauded as a dual
divinity in one hymn (6, 57) with Indra and in another with Soma (2, 40).
Thus statistically he occupies a somewhat higher position than Visnu (g 17).
In the later Vedic and the post-Vedic periods his name is mentioned with
increasing rareness. His individuality is indistinct and his anthropomorphic
traits are scanty. His foot is referred to when he is asked to trample on
the brand of the wicked. His right hand is also mentioned (6, 54 10 ). He
has (like Rudra) braided hair (6, 55 2 ) and a beard (10, 26 7 ). He wields a
golden spear (i, 42 6 ) and carries an awl (6, 53 5 - 6 - 8 ) or a goad (539. $8 2 ).
The wheel, the felly, and the seat of his car (6, 54 3 ) are spoken of and he
is called the best charioteer (6, 56 2 - 3 ). His car is drawn by goats 1 (ajasvd)
instead of horses (i, 38 4 ; 6, 55 3 4 ). He eats, for his food is gruel (6, 56 r
cp. 3, 527). It is probably for this reason that he is said to be toothless in
the SB. (i, 7, 4 7).

Pusan sees all creatures clearly and at once (3, 6 2 9), these identical
words being applied to Agni also (10, i87 4 ). He is the lord of all things
moving and stationary almost the same words with which Surya is described
(i, 1 15 ; 7, 6o 2 ). He is the wooer of his mother (6, 55 s ) or the lover of his
sister (ib. 4 - s), similar expressions being used of Surya (i, ii5 2 ) and of Agni
(10, 33). The gods are said to have given him, subdued by love, to the sun-
maiden Surya in marriage (6, 58 4 ). Probably as the husband of Surya, Pusan
is connected with the marriage ceremonial in the wedding hymn (10, 85),
being besought to take the bride s hand and lead her away and to bless her
in her conjugal relation 2 (v. 37). In another passage (9, 67 10 ) he is besought
to give his worshippers their share of maidens. With his golden ships which
move in the aerial ocean, subdued by love he acts as the messenger 3 of Surya
(6, 58 3 ). He moves onward beholding the universe (2, 4o 5 ; 6, 58 2 ) and
makes his abode in heaven (2, 4o 4 ). He is a guardian, who goes at the in
stigation of Savitr, knowing and beholding all creatures. In a hymn devoted
to his praise, Pusan is said as best of charioteers to have driven downwards
the golden wheel of the sun (6, 56 3 ), but the connexion is obscure (cp. Nir.
2, 6). A frequent and exclusive epithet of Pusan is glowing (aghrni). He
is once termed agohya, not to be concealed , an attribute almost peculiar
to Savitr.

Pusan is born on the far path of paths, on the far path of heaven and
of earth; he goes to and returns from both the beloved abodes, knowing
them (6, 1 7 6 ). Owing to this familiarity he conducts the dead on the far path to
the Fathers, as Agni and Savitr take them to where the righteous have gone
and where they and the gods abide, and leads his worshippers thither in
safety, showing them the way (10, i7 3 ~ 5 ). The AV. also speaks of Pusan
as conducting to the world of the righteous, the beautiful world of the gods
(AV. 1 6, 9 2 ; 1 8, 2 53 ). So Pusan s goat conducts the sacrificial horse (i,i62 2 - 3 ).
Perhaps to Pusan s familiarity with the (steep) paths is due the notion that
his car is drawn by the sure-footed goat.

As knower of paths, Pusan is conceived as a guardian of roads. He is
besought to remove dangers, the wolf, the waylayer, from the path (1,42 X ~ 3 J.
In this connexion he is called vimuco napdt, son of deliverance 4 . The same epithet is applied to him in another passage (6,55 T ) and he is twice (8, 4 15>l6 )
called vimocana, deliverer . As vimuco napdt he is invoked to deliver from
sin (AV. 6, ii2 3 ). Pusan is prayed to disperse foes and make the paths
lead to booty (6,53 4 ), to remove foes, to make the paths good, and to lead
to good pasture (i, 427- 8 ). He is invoked to protect from harm on his path
(6, 54 9 ) and to grant an auspicious path (10, 59 7 J. He is the guardian of
every path (6, 49*) and lord of the road (6, 53 1 ). He is a guide (prapathya]
on roads (VS. 22, 20). So in the Sutras, whoever is starting on a journey
makes an offering to Pusan, the road-maker, while reciting RV. 6, 53; and
whoever loses his way, turns to Pusan (AGS. 3, 7 8 - 9 ; SSS. 3, 49). Moreover,
in the morning and evening offerings to all gods and beings, Pusan the road-
maker receives his on the threshold of the house (SGS. 2, 149).

Aknower of ways he can make hidden goods manifest and easy
to nnd (6, 48*5). He is in one passage (i, 23^- J 5 C p. TS. 3, 3, 9 1 ) said to
have found the king who was lost and hidden in secret (probably Soma), and
asked to bring him like a lost beast. So in the Sutras, Pusan is sacrificed
to when anything lost is sought (AGS. 3, 7 9 ). Similarly, it is characteristic of
Pusan that he follows and protects cattle (6, 545- 6 - I0 . 58" cp. 10, 263). He
preserves them from injury by falling into a pit, brings them home unhurt,
and drives back the lost (6, 547- 10 ). His goad directs cattle straight (6,53 9 ).
Perhaps connected with the idea of guiding straight is the notion that he
directs the furrow (4, 577). Pusan also protects horses (6, 54 5 ) and weaves
and smooths the clothing of sheep (10, 26 6 ). Hence beasts are said to be
sacred to Pusan (i, 5 1 2 ), and he is called the producer of cattle (MS. 4, 3 7 ;
TB. i, 7, 2 4 ). In the Sutras verses to Pusan are prescribed to be recited
when cows are driven to pasture or stray (SGS. 3, 9).

Pusan has various attributes in common with other gods. He is called
asura (5, 51"). He is strong (5, 43 9 )> vigorous (8, 4 15 ), nimble (6, 5 4 8 ),
powerful (i, I38 1 ), resistless (6, 48*5). He transcends mortals and is equal
to the gods in glory (6, 48 19 ). He is a ruler of heroes (i, io6 4 ), an uncon
querable protector and defender (i, 89 5 ), and assists in battle (6, 48 19 ). He
is a protector of the world (10, 173 cp. 2, 40 ). He is a seer, a protecting
friend of the priest, the unshaken friend born of old, of every suppliant (10,
265- 8 ). He is wise (i, 425) and liberal 5 (2, 31^). His bounty is particularly
often mentioned. He possesses all wealth (i, 89 6 ), abounds in wealth (8,4 15 ),
gives increase of wealth (i, 89 5 ), is beneficent (i, I38 2 ), bountiful (6, 58 4 ;
8, 4 l8 ), and bestows all blessings (i, 42 6 ). He is the strong friend of
abundance, the strong lord and increaser of nourishment (10, 26 7 - 8 ). The
term dasra, wonder-working , distinctive of the Asvins, is a few times (1,42*;
6, 56^) applied to him, as well as dasma, wondrous (i, 42 10 . I38 4 ) and
dasma-varcaS) of wondrous splendour (6, 58 4 ), usually said of Agni and Indra.
He is also twice (i, io6 4 ; 10, 64 3 ) called Narasamsa praised of men , an
epithet otherwise exclusively limited to Agni. He is once spoken of as all-
pervading (2, 4o 6 ). He is termed devotion-stimulating (9, 88 3 ), is invoked
to quicken devotion (2, 4o 6 ), and his awl is spoken of as prayer-instigating
(6, 53 8 ; cp. Savitr, p. 33).

The epithets exclusively connected with Pusan are dghrni, ajds va, vimo-
cana, vimuco napdt, and once <tw3\pustimbhara, bringing prosperity , anasta-
pasu, losing no cattle , anastavedas, losing no goods , karambhdd, eating
gruel . The latter attribute seems to have been a cause for despising Pusan
by some (cp. 6, 56*; i, i38 4 ) 6 . Karambha, mentioned three times in the RV.,
is Pusan s distinctive food, being contrasted with Soma as Indra s (6, 57 2 ).
Indra, however, shares it (3,527), and in the only two passages in which the adjective karambhin mixed with gruel occurs, it applies to the libation of
Indra (3, 52 ; 8, So 2 ). Piisan is the only god who receives the epithet
pasupa, protector of cattle (6, 58 2 ) directly (and not in comparisons).

The only deities with whom Pusan is invoked conjointly in the dual are
Soma (2, 40) and Indra (6, 57), whose brother he is once called (6, 55.
Next to these two, Pusan is most frequently addressed with Bhaga (i, Qo 4 ; 4, 3 o 2 4; 5, 41*. 46 2 ; 10, 125"; cp. SB. u, 4, 3^; KSS. 5, 13 ) and Visnu (1,90^;
5, 46^; 6, 2i9; 7, 44 1 ; i o, 66 s ), his name in all these passages of the RV.
being in juxtaposition with theirs. He is occasionally addressed with various
other deities also.

The evidence adduced does not show clearly that Pusan represents a
phenomenon of nature. But a large number of passages quoted at the
beginning point to his being closely connected with the sun. Yaska, too,
(Nir. 7, 9) explains Pusan to be the sun (Aditya), the preserver of all beings ,
and in post-Vedic literature Pusan occasionally occurs as a name of the sun.
The path of the sun which leads from earth to heaven, the abode of the
gods and the pious dead, might account for a solar deity being both a con
ductor of departed souls (like Savitr) and a guardian of paths in general.
The latter aspect of his character would explain his special bucolic features
as a guide and protector of cattle, which form a part of his general nature
as a promoter of prosperity. Mithra, the solar deity of the Avesta, has the
bucolic traits of increasing cattle and bringing back beasts that have strayed 7 .

Etymologically the word means prospered as derived from the root/z/f,
to cause to thrive . This side of his character is conspicuous both in his
epithets visvavedas, anastavedas, puruvasu, pustimbhara, and in the frequent
invocations to him to bestow wealth and protection (6, 48 15 &c.). He is lord
of great wealth, a stream of wealth, a heap of riches (6, 55- 3 ). But the
prosperitiy he confers is not, as in the case of Indra, Parjanya, and the
Maruts, connected with rain, but with light, which is emphasized by his ex
clusive epithet glowing . The welfare which he bestows results from the
protection he extends to men and cattle on earth, and from his guidance of
men to the abodes of bliss in the next world. Thus the conception which
seems to underlie the character of Pusan, is the beneficent power of the sun
manifested chiefly as a pastoral deity.

From: Vedic mythology - Macdonell, Arthur Anthony
Pūşhan is one of the Ādityās. He nourishes both the yajamāna and the Earth. Though the home of all the Gods is high above, ūrdhvam āyatanam, yet their main station or field of action differs. Thus the abode of Indra, Lord of the Divine Mind, is the Mind Station, Svar. Agni is stationed on Earth. The Maruts belong to the mid-region, the Life-world. Similarly the other Gods preside over their respective places and carry on their activities. Pūşhan belongs to the third station; still his station is taken as the Earth because he is the lord of mother Earth, supports and nourishes her. When he nourishes by his Āditya power the outer Earth-field, physical Matter, and the inner physical consciousness and is himself nourished and manifest, then comes Uşha, the Deity of the Dawn of higher Consciousness. And when the Ashvins espouse Uşha, he adopts these health-givers who effect increasing nourishment as parents (10.85.14).Nourished thus, Pūşhan Āditya showers the bounty of Indra and becomes his brother (6.55.5). Ultimately he becomes the brother of Earth and the space (divided into quarters) (6.58.4).
Even after the slaying of Vŗtra, the demons or Panis obstruct the path of the sacrificer, steal or cover the knowledge (cows); other haters of the Gods harass the devotee in his upward course, directly or indirectly, by robbing him of his wealth-Rays, veiling the path, showing wrong directions etc. It is here that the work of Pūşhan is specially seen. The traffickings of the Paņi and the like do not affect God Pūşhan. He is the lord of the Paths pathaspati. He does not lose cattle. Pūşhan aids in the effort of the sacrificer to reach the sun-world, even while living (6.53.3, 6.53.5, 6.56.5).


Pūşhan nourishes the sacrificer as well as the Earth. He is the progeny of Āditya as Indra who showers the wealth of knowledge, light, strength; elder to Uşha, he protects the Earth; brother of Indra, master of the route of the sacrificer, he guards the path, searches out the sacrificer, urges his effort (10.17.3).

From: Pushan
Nature of Pushan
Nature of Pūşhan conveyance
Pūşhan is one of the ādityas. He nourishes both the yajamāna and the Earth. Though the home of all the Gods is high above, ūrdhvam āyatanam, yet their main station or field of action differs. Thus the abode of Indra, Lord of the Divine Mind, is the Mind Station, Svar. Agni is stationed on Earth. The Maruts belong to the mid-region, the Life-world. Similarly the other Gods preside over their respective places and carry on their activities. Pūşhan belongs to the third station; still his station is taken as the Earth because he is the lord of mother Earth, supports and nourishes her. When he nourishes by his Aditya power the outer Earth-field, physical Matter, and the inner physical consciousness and is himself nourished and manifest, then comes Uşha, the Deity of the Dawn of higher Consciousness. And when the Ashvins espouse Uşha, he adopts these health-givers who effect increasing nourishment as parents (10.85.14).Nourished thus, Pūşhan Aditya showers the bounty of Indra and becomes his brother (6.55.5). Ultimately he becomes the brother of Earth and the space (divided into quarters) (6.58.4).
Even after the slaying of Vŗtra, the demons or Panis obstruct the path of the sacrificer, steal or cover the knowledge (cows); other haters of the Gods harass the devotee in his upward course, directly or indirectly, by robbing him of his wealth-Rays, veiling the path, showing wrong directions etc. It is here that the work of Pūşhan is specially seen. The traffickings of the Paņi and the like do not affect God Pūşhan. He is the lord of the Paths pathaspati. He does not lose cattle. Pūşhan aids in the effort of the sacrificer to reach the sun-world, even while living (6.53.3, 6.53.5, 6.56.5).
Pūşhan nourishes the sacrificer as well as the Earth. He is the progeny of ¡ditya as Indra who showers the wealth of knowledge, light, strength; elder to Uşha, he protects the Earth; brother of Indra, master of the route of the sacrificer, he guards the path, searches out the sacrificer, urges his effort (10.17.3).

MANTRA (1.23.13): THE HIDDEN SOMA
Bring him (Soma) whose seat is of many colours
And who sustains the Heaven, O Luminous Pūşhan,
Like a lost animal.

ā pūşhan chitra barhişham
.,Pūşhan, variegated, seat,
āghŗņe dharuņam divaĥ;
luminous on all sides, bearer or sustainer, of the Heaven,
ājā naşhţam yathā pashum.
attain, lost, just as, animal.

Details:
The God Soma, the essence of Delight, is the sustainer of all the Gods in Heaven; hence he is called a sustainer. As mentioned in several hymns, Soma is hidden everywhere. The prayer for Pūşhan is to find the hidden Soma just as one finds a lost animal from its tracks or footprints.
ā + ajā: bring inside (the subtle body).
aja: movement.

MANTRA (1.23.14): HIDDEN IN THE CAVE

Luminous Pūşhan found
In the cave the most hidden Soma placed (by the demons),
The Soma on the many-hued seat.

pūşhā rājānam āghŗņir
Pūşhan, Soma, luminous, apagūļham guhā hitam;
most hidden, cave, placed,
avindach chitra barhişham.
attained, many-hued, seat.

Details:
The Soma is hidden in difficult places by the demon Vŗtra. Hence the Delight is not easily accessible. Soma is imaged as having a many-hued seat since he embodies multiple powers.

MANTRA (1.23.15): THE GLORIES OF THE SIX WORLDS

He brings me in the appropriate order
The (glories) of the Soma-filled six worlds
Just as the plougher gives the grain to the bulls.

uto sa mahyam indubhiĥ
also, he, for me, moisteners (Soma),
şhad yuktām anu seşhidhat;
six, united, in due order, effecting or moving,
gobhir yavam na charkŗşhat.
bulls, grain, just as, ploughs again.

Details:
The six worlds are the seven worlds excluding the earth, the station of the sacrificer. Just as a farmer collects the grain and feeds it to the bulls repeatedly, similarly Pūşhan attains to the glory of the six worlds other than earth and brings this glory to the sacrificer again and again.
From: Pushan
Hymn 42: Pūşhanthe Guide
Rişhi: Kāņvaĥ Ghauraĥ

MANTRA (1.42.1): REMOVE THE OBSTACLES
O Pūşhan, convey us safely across the path;
Eliminate the obstacles in the path;
O Son (of Indra), be close to us, ahead of us.

sam pūşhann adhvanas tira
., Pūşhan, path, convey (us),
vy amho vimucho napāt;
., obstacles, eliminate, son (of Indra),
sakşhvā deva pra ņas puraĥ.
united, God, ., our, ahead of us.

Details:
sam + tura: convey us completely or safely.
pra + saksĥvā: be close to us.

MANTRA (1.42.2): FOES WHO WANT TO MASTER US

O Pūşhan, drive away the wicked and inauspicious wolf-demon from our path,
Who wants to be our master and order us.

yo naĥ pūşhann agho vŗko
who, us, Pūşhan, wicked, wolf,
duĥsheva ādideshati;
inauspicious, orders(us),
apa sma tam patho jahi.
., ., him, from the path, drive away.

Details:
In the inner journey there are obstacles caused by the demons, such as Vŗtra symbolised by wolf. It is easy for Pūşhan to drive away the foes; hence the prayer.
apa + jahi + sma: drive away.

MANTRA (1.42.3): THE DECEIVING FORCES

Him, who causes obstruction in the path of yajna
Who is a thief and a deceiver,
Drive him away far from the path.

apa tyam paripanthinam
., him, one who obstructs on the path,
muşhīvāņam hurashchitam;
thief, deceiver,
dūram adhi sruter aja.
far, from the path, make him go.

Details:
The psychological foes deceive us by increasing our ego.
apa + aja: apāja, drive away.

MANTRA (1.42.4): EVIL-SPEECH

Him who is robber of both what is present and not present,
Whose speech is evil and whose body burns others,
Trample (him) with your feet wherever he may be.

tvam tasya dvayāvino
you, him, robber of both (directly and indirectly),
aghashamsasya kasyachit;
with evil-speech, wherever he in,
padābhi tişhţha tapuşhim.
feet, trample, scourge.

Details:
The psychological foes rob the faculties already present in us; they also rob the faculties which are in the nascent state and not manifest yet. The speech of these foes is tinged with evil.

MANTRA (1.42.5): PROTECTION

O Knower, who eliminates the foes,
We pray for your protection, O Pūşhan
With which you did impel our fore-fathers.

ā tat te dasra mantumaĥ
., that, your, eliminator of foes, one full of knowledge,
pūşhann avo vŗņīmahe;
Pūşhan, protection, (we) pray,
yena pitrūn achodayaĥ.
with which, our fore-fathers, did impel.

MANTRA (1.42.6): GIVE RICHES TO OTHERS

O Lord of all prosperity
With weapons of golden radiance,
We pray for riches which we can give to others easily.

adhā no vishvasaubhaga
thus, our, lord of all prosperity,
hiraņyavāshīmattama;
with weapons of an excellent golden radiance,
dhanāni suşhaņā kŗdhi.
wealth, to offer easily, do;

Details:
When a person gets riches, usually he/she becomes greedy also. The prayer is that we may share our riches with others.

MANTRA (1.42.7): RIGHT TASKS

Lead us past our enemy;
Conduct us along the auspicious path easy to traverse;
O Pūşhan, make us know the right tasks to be done in this path.

athi naĥ sashchato naya
beyond, us, foes, lead,
sugā naĥ supathā kŗņu;
easy, us, auspicious path, do,
pūşhann iha kratum vidaĥ.
Pūşhan, here in our path, right tasks, know.

MANTRA (1.42.: ABUNDANT GROWTH

Lead us to the fertile region;
May we not face fresh hardship in the path;
O Pūşhan, make us know the right tasks to be done in this path.

abhi sūyavasam naya
towards, fertile region, lead us,
na navajvāro adhvane;
not, (face) fresh hardships, in the path,
pūşhann iha kratum vidaĥ.
Pūşhan, here, right actions, know.

Details:
Pūshan leads us to a condition or state of mind conducive to an overall development of our faculties.
sūyavasam: place with luxurious growth of grass; fertile region.

MANTRA (1.42.9): MAKE US SENSITIVE

Be mighty, fill us (with all felicities), give us generously;
Make us sensitive (in our movements and thought); feed us in all ways (physically and mentally);
O Pūşhan, make us know the right tasks to be done in this path.

shagdhi pūrdhi prayāmsi
be mighty, fill us, give generously,
cha shishīhi prāsy udaram;
and, (make us) sharp, fill, our bellies,
pūşhann iha kratum vidaĥ.
Pūşhan, here, right actions, know.

Details:
Be mighty for our benefit, make us bright, fill us with thyself, give us well-being, fill us with enjoyable felicities.

MANTRA (1.42.10): CELEBRATE PUSHAN

We do not blame Pūşhan;
Him we celebrate with hymns of praise;
We solicit mighty Pūşhanfor riches.

na pūşhaņam methāmasi
not, Pūşhan, blame,
sūktair abhi gŗņīmasi;
with hymns, in his front, we praise,
vasūni dasmam īmahe.
riches, mighty, solicit.


From: Pushan

Also see:
(Rig Veda)
HYMN XLII. Pūṣan.
HYMN CXXXVIII. Pūṣan.
HYMN XL. Soma and Pūṣan.
HYMN LIII. Pūṣan.
HYMN LIV. Pūṣan.
HYMN LV. Pūṣan.
HYMN LVI, Pūṣan.
HYMN LVII. Indra and Pūṣan.
HYMN LVIII. Pūṣan.
HYMN XXVI. Pūṣan.

Got this from the book Hindu Polytheism - Alain Daniélou



Pusan (the Nourisher), Security, the Protector of Cattle
SECURITY (Pasan ) is connected with the Inherited-Share (Bhaga). Pusan
is the guardian of the ways; he protects animals and men from the dangers of
the road. He guides men and guides the dead, finds lost things and animals:
He is the god of cattle, fecundity, and herds. Worshiped by magicians, he is the
patron of conjurers, especially those who discover stolen goods.

As the source of fecundity Pusan is associated with semen, that is, the
offering (soma), and its chalice, the moon. He is also connected with the mar-
riage ceremonial. Pusan is frequently mentioned in the Vedas. Many hymns
are addressed to him.

The name Pusan comes from the root pu~, which means "nourisher."
"Once the lord-of-progeny (Praj apati) had shaped all the living creatures, it
was Pusan who nourished them." i Taittinya Briihma1}a.)

Pusan is the lover of his sister Surya (the solar one). He helps to perpetuate
the cycle of day and night, and he shares with Soma the guardianship of living
creatures. He is invoked, along with various deities, but most frequently with
Indra and Bhaga. Pusan is said to be "splendid" (Aghroi), "of wonderful ap-
pearance or power" (Dasra, Dasma, Dasmavarcas, and Kapardin).
In the Nirukta, and in works of later date, Pusan, like other Adityas, is
identified with the sun. He is the brother of Indra.

Pusan is toothless, and feeds upon a kind of gruel. All the oblations offered
to him must be ground. He is called the gruel-eater (Karambhad). The cause
of his toothlessness is variously explained. According to the Taittiriya Samhitii,
Rudra, excluded from a sacrifice, pierced the offering with an arrow. A portion
of this offering was presented to Pusan, and broke his teeth. According to the
Satapatha Briihmana (1.7.4), he lost his teeth while eating the offering in a
sacrifice held when Rudra attacked Prajapati to prevent him from committing
incest with his daughter. In the Mahabharata, Rudra ran up to the gods who
were present at Daksa's sacrifice and, in his rage, knocked out Bhaga's eyes and
with his foot broke the teeth of Pusan, who was eating the offering. In the
Puranas, it is Virabhadra, a manifestation of Siva, who disturbed the sacrifice
of the gods and knocked out Pusan's teeth.
Only traces of Pusan's cult remain in later Hinduism.

2 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing these details.
    Can you help me with one best mantra both vedic and beej mantra for pleasing Pusan deva.

    I want to seek his blessing since I am born born under revati nakshatra.

    Warm regards,
    Karan

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for sharing these details.
    Can you help me with one best mantra both vedic and beej mantra for pleasing Pusan deva.

    I want to seek his blessing since I am born born under revati nakshatra.

    Warm regards,
    Karan

    ReplyDelete